Biography

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Denise Ramirez, Ph.D., studied brain cholesterol metabolism and its effects on learning and memory in the laboratory of Dr. David Russell, Ph.D., for her Ph.D. thesis. She then went on to study the role of novel SNARE proteins in spontaneous neurotransmission during postdoctoral work in the laboratory of Dr. Ege Kavalali, Ph.D. Dr. Ramirez was the founding Core Manager since 2014 and now serves as the Director of the UTSW Whole Brain Microscopy Facility (WBMF) in the Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics. She leverages her 17 years of hands-on optical imaging experience to facilitate the use of unique high-throughput volumetric imaging technologies and identify novel anatomical information to promote both basic and translational neuroscience. For more information on the WBMF, our instrumentation and services, please see the links to the right. I welcome you to contact me with any questions you may have about our facility.

denise.ramirez@utsouthwestern.edu

214-648-0203

Office location – NL10.125B

Education

Undergraduate
Saint Mary's University (2003), Biology
Graduate School
UT Southwestern Medical Center (2009), Biology

Research Interest

  • 3D reconstruction
  • connectomics
  • digital pathology
  • histology
  • image analysis
  • neuroscience
  • serial two-photon tomography
  • stroke
  • volumetric imaging

Publications

Featured Publications LegendFeatured Publications

Anatomy, Histology, and Nerve Density of Clitoris and Associated Structures: Clinical Applications to Vulvar Surgery.
Jackson LA, Hare AM, Carrick KS, Ramirez DMO, Hamner JJ, Corton MM, Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 2019 Jun
Gross and Histologic Anatomy of the Pelvic Ureter: Clinical Applications to Pelvic Surgery.
Jackson LA, Ramirez DMO, Carrick KS, Pedersen R, Spirtos A, Corton MM, Obstet Gynecol 2019 May 133 5 896-904
Gross and Histologic Relationships of the Retropubic Urethra to Lateral Pelvic Sidewall and Anterior Vaginal Wall in Female Cadavers: Clinical Applications to Retropubic Surgery.
Hamner JJ, Carrick KS, Ramirez DMO, Corton MM Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 2018 Sep
Cell-Specific Loss of SNAP25 from Cortical Projection Neurons Allows Normal Development but Causes Subsequent Neurodegeneration.
Hoerder-Suabedissen A, Korrell KV, Hayashi S, Jeans A, Ramirez DMO, Grant E, Christian HC, Kavalali ET, Wilson MC, Molnár Z Cereb. Cortex 2018 May

Books

Featured Books Legend Featured Books

Professional Associations/Affiliations

  • Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) (2019)
  • Society for Neuroscience (2009)