Biography

Steven L. Small, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Neurology, is Dean of the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, and the Aage and Margareta Møller Distinguished Professor at the University of Texas at Dallas. Dr. Small is Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Irvine, where he was the Chair of the Department of Neurology from 2010-2017, and at The University of Chicago, where he founded the first high-field MRI research center in Chicago in 1999.

As a scientist, Dr. Small has been a pioneer in understanding the anatomy and physiology of the human brain and its relation to function by direct investigation of human subjects, particularly related to language comprehension and production, and with an emphasis on distributed brain networks. This work has encompassed the study of normal adults and children, adults with neurological disease (especially stroke), and children with developmental impairments.

Dr. Small's translational neurology research focuses on language recovery after stroke in both adults and children. Neurobiologically plausible models of human brain function are typically based on detailed animal models. For human speech and language, the cortical dorsal-ventral network architecture associated with the extended auditory system of nonhuman primates represents a strong model. A postero-dorsal network connects the auditory cortex to the posterior and dorsal part of inferior frontal cortex (IFC) (Brodmann area [BA] 44) via posterior superior temporal (pST) cortex, inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and premotor cortex (PMC), whereas an antero-ventral network traverses anterior superior temporal cortex (aST) to terminate in more anterior and ventral parts of the inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45). Recent findings suggest that language recovery from stroke depends on integration and segregation of these network communities that have been evolutionarily co-opted for language, and that focusing language therapy on these biological networks might have long term advantages. This work has elaborated network-level translational neurology of stroke recovery by way of investigation of imitation-based treatment of aphasia targeting the dorsal language network.

Dr. Small is the founder of both the Society for the Neurobiology of Language and the MIT Press open access journal, Neurobiology of Language.

As Dean of the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Dr. Small aims to continue its upward trajectory by expanding and broadening research and education in neuroscience, psychology, and speech and hearing sciences, building partnerships with other educational, industrial, and philanthropic institutions in Dallas, particularly the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and advancing the stature of the premier Carnegie Tier 1 research institution in Dallas-Fort Worth, the fourth largest metropolitan area in the United States.

Web: www.drsmall.org

Twitter: @stevenlsmall

LinkedIn: slsmall

Research Interest

  • Language Disorders after Stroke (Aphasia)
  • Neurobiology of Language
  • Sports-Related Head Impacts

Publications

Featured Publications LegendFeatured Publications

Functional neuroanatomy of gesture-speech integration in children varies with individual differences in gesture processing.
Demir-Lira ÖE, Asaridou SS, Raja Beharelle A, Holt AE, Goldin-Meadow S, Small SL, Dev Sci 2018 09 21 5 e12648
Network specialization during adolescence: Hippocampal effective connectivity in boys and girls.
Riley JD, Chen EE, Winsell J, Davis EP, Glynn LM, Baram TZ, Sandman CA, Small SL, Solodkin A, Neuroimage 2018 07 175 402-412
Therapy-Induced Plasticity in Chronic Aphasia Is Associated with Behavioral Improvement and Time Since Stroke.
Santhanam P, Duncan ES, Small SL, Brain Connect 2018 04 8 3 179-188
Imitation-based aphasia therapy increases narrative content: a case series.
Duncan ES, Small SL, Clin Rehabil 2017 Nov 31 11 1500-1507
The pace of vocabulary growth during preschool predicts cortical structure at school age.
Asaridou SS, Demir-Lira ÖE, Goldin-Meadow S, Small SL, Neuropsychologia 2017 04 98 13-23
Resistant Hypertension after Hypertensive Intracerebral Hemorrhage Is Associated with More Medical Interventions and Longer Hospital Stays without Affecting Outcome.
Hong D, Stradling D, Dastur CK, Akbari Y, Groysman L, Al-Khoury L, Chen J, Small SL, Yu W, Front Neurol 2017 8 184
Repeated movie viewings produce similar local activity patterns but different network configurations.
Andric M, Goldin-Meadow S, Small SL, Hasson U, Neuroimage 2016 Nov 142 613-627
Increased Modularity of Resting State Networks Supports Improved Narrative Production in Aphasia Recovery.
Duncan ES, Small SL, Brain Connect 2016 09 6 7 524-9
Sentence understanding depends on contextual use of semantic and real world knowledge.
Tune S, Schlesewsky M, Nagels A, Small SL, Bornkessel-Schlesewsky I, Neuroimage 2016 Aug 136 10-25
Utility of EEG measures of brain function in patients with acute stroke.
Wu J, Srinivasan R, Burke Quinlan E, Solodkin A, Small SL, Cramer SC, J. Neurophysiol. 2016 06 115 5 2399-405

Books

Featured Books Legend Featured Books

Honors & Awards

  • Aage and Margareta Møller Distinguished Professor
    Endowed Chair, University of Texas at Dallas (2019)
  • Founding Editor-in-Chief
    Neurobiology of Language (MIT Press) (2019)
  • Top Doctors
    Orange County, California (2019)
  • Distinguished Career Award
    Society for the Neurobiology of Language (2018)
  • Scientific Program Advisory Committee (SPAC)
    American Neurological Association (2017-2020)
  • Secretary/Treasurer
    Association of University Professors of Neurology (AUPN) (2015-2021)
  • Theodore von Kármán Fellow
    RWTH Aachen University (Germany) (2014)
  • Stanley van den Noort Professor
    Endowed Chair, University of California, Irvine (2010-2019)
  • Editor-in-Chief
    Brain and Language (Elsevier) (2005-2019)

Professional Associations/Affiliations

  • University of California, Irvine (2010-2017)
  • Society for the Neurobiology of Language (2009)
  • American Neurological Association (1999)
  • University of Chicago (1999-2010)
  • Society for Neuroscience (1991)
  • American Academy of Neurology (1990)